Linux

Getting Started with Vim

Beginners are often scared away from vi and vim from the start because the first thing they usually do is open it, try to start typing, and then see all kinds of random things happen, none of which type text to the screen. They even have trouble trying to quit! Well, fear no more, I've got the basics outlined here for you. For the record, vimtutor should come with your vim and it is the best place to start.

Customizing Gnome 3 Desktop Environment in Arch Linux

Arch Linux is known for being a lightweight do-it-yourself distribution. Unlike some other distributions like Ubuntu and Linux Mint that come with a preconfigured desktop and all the programs installed, Arch Linux let's you build things up from the ground up yourself. For the uninitiated this can be an intimidating task, but it's not that once you wrap your mind around it. I'm going to go over customizing a Gnome 3 desktop environment including icons, cursors, themes, wallpapers, etc.

Customizing Openbox Window Manager in Arch Linux

This article will walk through all the steps needed to create a unique and personalized desktop. I'll cover fonts, icons, mouse cursors, GTK themes, Openbox themes, Openbox menu generation, wallpaper and system monitors. In my example I will will make references to packages contained in Arch Linux. The same packages should be available for any popular Linux distribution, although the names may change slightly.

Installing, Configuring and Customizing Arch Linux

Arch Linux is a great distro that boasts bleeding edge up-to-date rolling releases as well as a very light and efficient base install. There is no graphical install and it expects you to have some basic Linux chops already just to perform the installation. Beginners shouldn't be scared away though because Arch Linux has a great wiki and awesome documentation.

Useful Linux Bash Shell Aliases

Typing long commands over and over gets old. Use bash aliases to make your life easier and impress your peers. Add these to your .bashrc and/or .bash_profile. Personally I use only one and symlink them together. These are just some examples of how you can use alias. Anytime you find yourself repeating lengthy commands think about creating an alias. Optionally, if it's a long command you are only going to be using for a short period, be sure to use history tools like ! and !? to quickly repeat previous commands.